What is
this place?

What did you think when you walked in for the first time?

Sparse, classic, beautiful. What is this place? It was unlike any place I had ever seen...and I was very intrigued!

In what ways are you active
at FRIEDA?

I wish I had time to volunteer once a week. But did demonstrate how to make dumplings to celebrate Chinese New Year - families make them together and eat them at midnight. Another time, I presented a Taiwanese tea-tasting ceremony to celebrate the start of the spring tea harvest and the Year of the Pig.

What is your most memorable moment at FRIEDA?

The first time I joined a Passover dinner celebration. I still remember the long, long table that stretched from the front to the back of the space, tall lighted candles among the flowers in the darkened room, course after course of delicious overflowing dishes for more than 40 guests, most of whom I didn’t know. Sara got up and spoke about the origin of the holiday. After the meal, we danced to the live music. As you can tell, I remember it like it was yesterday! It was absolutely enchanting. Again I thought, what is this place?!

What else do you wish FRIEDA offered?

FRIEDA already offers plenty, including compassion and love. It has succeeded in creating a community and a piazza - a welcoming space in the center of town. 

What does FRIEDA mean to you?

At this point, I can hardly imagine life without it. It’s like a dear family that I count on to share, to interact, and to always be affectionate and loving!

FRIEDA in one word:

Unique!!! 

Dumpling Making and Food-tasting (February, 16 2017).
FRIEDA Community Supper XXIV - "Silk Road: China" (October 7, 2017)
Taiwanese Tea-tasting (February 17, 2019)
Each person had several cups made from the same tea leaves, each cup subtly distinct based on how much time the leaves had steeped. The next cup could be stronger, sweeter, or longer-lasting on the tongue.
Taiwanese Tea-tasting
to usher in the Year of the Pig

17 February 2019
The history of tea dates back to ancient China, almost 5,000 years ago. According to legend, tea was accidentally discovered in 2732 B.C., when Emperor Shen-Nung set up camp in the shade of a large tree. Some of the trees’ dry leaves blew into a large pot of boiling water, changing the water’s color and emitting a pleasant scent. The emporer tasted it and let out the sound “T’sa,” meaning godlike. Until today, “cha” is the Chinese word for tea.

Shortly after the start of the Chinese new year in February 2019, Michelle shared her knowledge of Chinese/Taiwanese history and culture by presenting a Tea-tasting at FRIEDA.

During six tastings, each with six participants, and using her own ceramic tea set, she spun tales of sitting with friends and tasting teas in what feels like a meditative act, with a series of repeated individual steps. Sitting with a group of people, even ones you have never met before, enjoying a delicate cup of tea can be unexpectedly soothing.

The participants listened and watched carefully as Michelle rinsed the tea set with very warm – but never boiling – water, passing the brewed tea leaves from one teapot to a tea container. They took their time sipping the delicate tea and inhaling its calming aroma. Each person had several cups made from the same tea leaves, each cup subtly distinct based on how much time the leaves had steeped. The next cup could be stronger, sweeter, or longer-lasting on the tongue.

“Every day is an occasion to celebrate with tea.”